ccTLD

A ccTLD, or “country code top-level domain,” is a type of internet domain that is specific to a particular country or territory. It is identified by the two-letter code that corresponds to the country or territory, and is used to identify websites that are associated with that location.

For example, the ccTLD for the United States is “.us,” and the ccTLD for Canada is “.ca.” Websites that use these ccTLDs are typically intended for users within the corresponding country or territory, and may be more relevant or trustworthy to users in that location.

ccTLDs are managed by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA), which is a department of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). In order to use a ccTLD, a website owner must register the domain with the appropriate registry and follow any applicable policies and regulations.

In addition to country-specific ccTLDs, there are also a number of generic ccTLDs, such as “.info” and “.pro,” which are not associated with a specific country or territory.

In conclusion, a ccTLD is a type of internet domain that is specific to a particular country or territory, and is identified by a two-letter code. Websites that use ccTLDs are typically intended for users within the corresponding country or territory, and are managed by the IANA through the ICANN. In addition to country-specific ccTLDs, there are also a number of generic ccTLDs that are not associated with a specific location.

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