Nofollow Attribute

The nofollow attribute is an HTML attribute that can be added to a hyperlink to request that search engines not follow the link and not pass any link equity or PageRank to the linked webpage. The nofollow attribute is used to indicate to search engines that the link should not be followed and that the linked webpage should not receive any benefit from the link.

The nofollow attribute was introduced by Google in 2005 as a way to help combat spam on the web. Before the introduction of the nofollow attribute, it was easy for spammers to manipulate search engine rankings by creating large numbers of low-quality, spammy links pointing to their websites. The nofollow attribute was introduced as a way to stop this practice by allowing webpage owners to indicate to search engines that certain links should not be followed.

The nofollow attribute is placed in the href attribute of a hyperlink and takes the form rel=”nofollow”. For example:

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The nofollow attribute is used in a variety of situations. For example, it is often used on links in comments sections of blogs and forums to prevent spammy comments from manipulating search engine rankings. It is also used on sponsored or paid links to indicate to search engines that the link is being paid for and should not be given the same weight as a normal editorial link.

It’s important to note that the nofollow attribute is a request, not a command. Search engines are not required to honor the request, and some may choose to ignore it and follow the link regardless. However, most major search engines will respect the nofollow attribute and will not follow the link or pass any link equity to the linked webpage.

In conclusion, the nofollow attribute is an HTML attribute that can be added to a hyperlink to request that search engines not follow the link and not pass any link equity or PageRank to the linked webpage. The nofollow attribute is used to combat spam and to indicate to search engines that certain links should not be given the same weight as normal editorial links.

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